407-645-5933 ext. 236 info@jfgo.org

June 10, 2022

Seniors and Hoarding

No one likes a dirty home where belongings are chaotically piled on top of each other like at a flea market. Unfortunately, retirees are particularly susceptible to this kind of hoarding. Seniors can turn into hoarders when they fill every inch of free space in their home with old junk because it “might come in handy one day.” Holding on to useless items like this can create obstacles in the home, which increase a senior’s chance of tripping and falling. Dirt and dust build-up and other unsanitary living conditions also carry serious health risks.

Hoarding tends to worsen with age. Excessive hoarding increases the likelihood of seniors being physically injured in the home. The inability to maneuver around items can cause serious falls or other injuries, and messy homes can also block emergency workers from reaching a senior in need. In addition, hoarding can be a sign of a serious medical condition like dementia or Alzheimer’s.

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

May 6, 2022

Transportation Issues While Living at Home

For many people as they get older, the instinct is to stay at home as long as possible. Even if a person at home has visitors, they may still be alone most of the time, especially if they no longer drive. The cost of hiring a driver on top of living expenses may amount to more than the cost of senior living.

Relying on others when you need to go somewhere can be challenging and frustrating. When a person moves into a senior community, however, they gain access to scheduled bus trips to the supermarket, banks, convenience stores, and more, as well as fun outings like theater and restaurant trips. The residents also receive transportation, usually in a car or van, to local appointments for beauty appointments and medical visits.

Many senior communities offer concierge services to schedule medical appointments so that the resident has seamless transportation. Having one’s transportation taken care of in this way may be safer than having elderly drivers on the road.

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

June 3, 2022

Exercising as a Senior

Seniors may forgo exercise for any number of reasons. They may have mobility issues or lack access to the proper equipment. They may struggle with motivation or simply don’t know where to start. 

Most senior living communities offer a full range of gym equipment and a wide variety of classes such as chair exercise, yoga, weight lifting, dance, and more. Having access to these opportunities that improve mobility, strength, and overall wellness make a huge impact on a senior’s life. And of course, the support of friends in your senior living community can often be the best motivation.

We all know regular exercise is good for heart health and weight management. However, there are many other benefits to exercise, such as managing anxiety and depression, improving mood, and reducing blood pressure. Seniors who are fit are less likely to fall. Exercise also promotes healthy bones, muscles, and joints.

In addition, the Alzheimer’s Association states “growing evidence indicates that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by adopting key lifestyle habits such as healthy eating and exercise. A daily schedule of physical, social, and cognitive activities is ideal for the body and the brain.”

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

May 27, 2022

The Aid and Attendance Benefit

Wartime veterans and their surviving spouses, 65 years and older, may be entitled to a tax-free benefit called Aid and Attendance provided by the Department of Veteran Affairs. Veterans must have served some time in active duty to be eligible.

The benefit is designed to provide financial aid to help offset the cost of long-term care for those who need assistance with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, and transferring. The benefits are quite significant. The single veteran may earn approximately $2,000 per month. Surviving spouses may earn approximately $1,300 per month. A married veteran may earn approximately $2,400 per month, and two married veterans may earn approximately $3,200 a month.

Several years ago, I visited a woman in a rehabilitation facility who was terrified of going home alone to recover from her illness. I suggested she move to Cascade Heights where many of her friends from the seniors group at the Jewish Community Center lived. She responded that she would love to move, but she cannot afford it. I asked her, “If you had access to $1,300 more each month, could you afford Cascade Heights?” She answered affirmatively. Like many of the women in her generation, her husband was a World War ll veteran, and she qualified for the Aid and Attendance Benefit. She was able to move to Cascade Heights, and she was very happy there. This is a little-known benefit that can truly transform a person’s life.

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

May 13, 2022

Housekeeping as a Senior

Home injuries are a leading cause of adult hospitalization, particularly for women. One of the most common ways home injuries happen is when household chores like cooking, tinkering, and cleaning go wrong.

It’s understandable that most seniors prefer to stay in their own homes for as long as possible—but it goes without saying that the elderly are at a greater risk of home injury. One fall can be fatal, which is why seniors should be extra careful when doing chores. Sometimes, hiring a home companion is the solution. Many home care agencies offer light housekeeping and meal preparation services to mitigate the risk of injury.

Housekeeping can be quite challenging for seniors who no longer have the energy or mobility to scrub, polish, or do laundry. Tasks like changing linens require a great deal of strength and coordination, as do yard work and property maintenance. In senior living communities, housekeeping, linen service, and maintenance are provided by a professional team.

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

April 29, 2022

When to Consider Senior Living

Being a part of a caring community—whether it be family, friends, or an organization—is known to reduce stress. When determining whether it’s time for senior living, ask yourself or a trusted loved one the following questions:

  1. Am I frequently socializing and connecting with others?
  2. Am I exercising regularly?
  3. Am I eating fresh, nutritious meals?
  4. Am I setting goals and enjoying a sense of purpose?

If you answered “no” to any of these questions, then it may indicate it’s time to consider senior living. Fortunately, you don’t have to decide alone; Jewish Pavilion is here to help.

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.