407-645-5933 ext. 236 info@jfgo.org

July 8, 2022

Caring for Someone with Dementia

It is estimated that 1 in 3 people with dementia and 1 in 7 of those with Alzheimer’s live alone. A diagnosis of dementia does not automatically mean a person cannot safely live independently; some people may be able to live on their own for a time after their initial diagnosis. Others may be at too much risk to continue living alone.

It is common for people living with dementia to go through a series of stages, from complete independence to living with someone or needing a long-term care placement over the course of disease progression. When a person who has lived alone eventually needs to consider other options, the move to live with someone can be difficult for all those involved. Some people with dementia may try to hide or compensate for the problems they are experiencing. If you are a family member or caregiver of a person with dementia, it can be difficult to decide whether a person who is living alone is truly in need of help.

Please keep in mind that just as a child cannot be safely left alone, neither can seniors with child-like capacities or judgment be safely left alone.

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

July 1, 2022

Exercising Our Brains

Most people notice changes in their thinking and memory as they grow older. Neurologists tell us that some older adults develop dementia, however, most memory changes are age-related and normal.

Staying physically active benefits every organ in our bodies—and that includes the brain. Our brains also need a good mental workout. Studies show that cognitive decline can be reduced through a combination of daily activities, like using a computer and playing word games.

Mental stimulation encourages new connections between brain cells—and these connections provide alternate pathways for accessing memories, making it easier for the brain to compensate for the cognitive changes associated with dementia.

The emphasis definitely is on “new,” because neurologists say that when it comes to top-notch brain exercise, novelty is especially beneficial. 

  • The number one way to stay mentally (and physically) fit is dance.  The combination of learning new information and movement is especially good for the brain.
  • Consider taking classes—both the information and social interaction help the brain!
  • Learn a new language or art form.
  • Read and join a book club for both mental and social stimulation.
  • Do puzzles of all sorts.
  • Play video games.
  • Get outside and garden!

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

September 16, 2022

What is Elder Abuse?

Elder abuse is defined as “an intentional act or failure to act by a caregiver or another person in a relationship involving an expectation of trust that causes or creates a risk of harm to an older adult.” It is a term under which five types of abuse are reflected:

  1. Caregiver Neglect: Family members who live with their elderly parents may leave their loved ones alone while they are at work. While they would not leave their children alone, a senior with dementia may be just as vulnerable.
  2. Financial Fraud and Exploitation
  3. Psychological Abuse
  4. Sexual Abuse
  5. Physical Abuse

At least 10% of adults age 65 and older will experience some form of elder abuse in a given year, with some older adults simultaneously experiencing more than one type of abuse.

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

July 22, 2022

Hydration for Seniors

Water, the most important liquid on the planet, makes up roughly 60% of the human body. That is why it is so important to stay hydrated. Most doctors agree that you should try and consume eight to ten 8-oz. cups (64-80 fluid ounces) of water each day.

The health benefits of drinking water are numerous:

  • Keeps your skin hydrated. Your skin is mostly made of water. When dehydrated, it can lead to disorders and wrinkles. Drinking water is the easiest and cheapest way to stay looking young!
  • Lubricates your joints. Cartilage contains 80% water. Dehydration lessens the effectiveness cartilage has on joints and, in turn, leads to pain and inflammation.
  • Aids in weight loss. Water is the perfect zero-calorie drink to replace soda or other sugary drinks. Drinking a big glass of water before a meal will also help prevent overeating.
  • Promotes healthy kidneys. Your kidneys are primarily used to filter liquids that come through your body. When dehydrated, kidney stones can start to form and, in extreme cases, dehydration can lead to kidney failure.
  • Relieves allergies. When your body is dehydrated, its airway constricts. This heightens breathing difficulties brought on by allergies or asthma.
  • Helps with healthy digestion. The digestive system is reliant on water to process food correctly. Dehydration can lead to digestive problems, constipation, and heartburn.

Water is so important to our everyday lives, and we should make a concerted effort to drink the recommended amount. Seniors tend to exercise less, and exercise increases one’s thirst, so they need to be especially careful to drink enough water. 

According to the Institute of Medicine, almost 75% of Americans suffer from dehydration. There are plenty of ways to make sure you reach your daily recommended water intake. Try remembering to drink a glass of water after every bathroom break, or use one of the numerous water tracking apps. Keep a water bottle by your side.

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.

July 29, 2022

Dehydration in Seniors

Dehydration is dangerous no matter what your age, but seniors are at a greater risk for dehydration than other age groups. Dehydration happens when you don’t drink enough water. When your body’s water content is too low, it causes damage quickly. Dehydration is especially prevalent on hot days or after vigorous exercise. Mild or moderate dehydration is easy to recover from, but severe dehydration requires immediate medical attention.

Risks for seniors experiencing dehydration include:

  • Diarrhea and vomiting: in addition to losing fluids, your body’s electrolytes and minerals are quickly depleted;
  • Fever: high fevers quickly lead to dehydration. The higher the fever, the faster you become dehydrated;
  • Excessive sweating: if you don’t replace the fluids lost while sweating, you can become dehydrated. Don’t wait to replace fluids at the end of a workout or strenuous activity. Instead, drink a little water all along to avoid severe dehydration;
  • Increased urination: diabetes that isn’t yet diagnosed or controlled through diet or medication can lead to passing more urine and depleting your water supply.

Signs of dehydration include:

  • Feeling unquenchable thirst
  • Few or no tears
  • Dry, sticky mouth
  • Not urinating frequently
  • Dark-colored urine
  • Unexplained tiredness
  • Feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • Confusion
  • Black stool

Call your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms:

  • Diarrhea or vomiting that lasts longer than 24 hours
  • Feeling irritable and disoriented
  • Sleepier than usual without reason
  • Inability to keep fluids down

While most seniors face major adjustments when transitioning to an elder-care community, Jewish seniors face additional challenges. Not only do they lose their homes, and many of their friends, but they also lose ties to their cultural heritage. This is where the Jewish Pavilion, a 501c3 non-profit, steps in. The Pavilion serves as a resource that provides room visits, festive holiday celebrations, and more to 450 Jewish residents across 50 senior facilities. The Jewish Pavilion promotes inclusion, and thousands of seniors of all faiths are welcomed into our programs.

The Orlando Senior Help Desk (407-678-9363) helps thousands of callers navigate their way through the daunting senior maze, alleviating caregiver stress while giving advice on all types of elder issues.